• Ulele statue at Ulele restaurant in Tampa, Florida. Also known as Princess Uleyli

    Princess Ulele is a Tampa History Mystery

  • Florida’s Native American Archers

  • Merchant-Traders of Florida

  • native american history for kids

    New Book About Princess Ulele and Juan Ortiz

  • Description of Ucita- 1st Native Town Encountered by De Soto

Random Posts

Charlesbourg-Royal in Quebec

The first European colony in Canada (after the Vikings in 1000 AD) was the French colony of Charlesbourg-Royal in modern-day Quebec, Canada. Built in 1544 it w

Review: Como Era Gostoso o meu Frances (1971)

Como Era Gostoso o meu Frances translates into English as How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman. This movie was produced in 1971 about the experiences of a Frenc

Tampa rips out Ulele statue in the dark of night

Ulele statue in TampaEditor’s Note: Ulele was a Native American princess who rescued a Spanish captive named Juan Ortiz from execution by her father, Chief Ucita. These events

De Gourges Florida Expedition in 1567

Account of the retaking of Fort Caroline (Fort San Mateo) from the Spanish by de Gourgues in April 1567.

News

Ulele statue in Tampa

Princess Ulele Statue Returns

Princess Ulele, known a Florida’s Pocahontas, is a local legend in Tampa, Florida thus it was quite the surprise when a statue of her was removed from the Tampa riverwalk in Full Story »

Georgia Before Oglethorpe

Georgia Before Oglethorpe

You've reached a one-stop source for current information about the state of Georgia's little-known first two centuries after first European contact. My intent in this site is to pr Full Story »

French La Florida

Fort Caroline at Evelyn Plantation in GA?

In the mid 1700s English naturalist William Bartram described visiting the ruins of an old French or Spanish fort along the Altamaha River in Georgia. He described these ruins as a Full Story »

Spanish La Florida

Juan Ortiz and Princess Uleleh Hirrihigua

The following article was written by F. P. Fleming and appeared in Publications of the Florida Historical Society, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Jul., 1908), pp. 42-47. It recounts the true stor Full Story »